FAQs

General

How do I make an appointment?

Simply call us at during our working hours or you can request an appointment online using this form.

Do I need a referral to make an appointment?

Most medical specialists will accept only referred patients. This is mainly to try to ensure that the specialist you are seeing is appropriate for you and your condition. Check with your insurance company to see if a referral is necessary.

What to bring for your initial consultation?

For your initial consultation you will need to bring a referral letter from your physician if required.

Here is check list for your initial consultation:

  • Driver's License or a valid ID
  • Insurance information
  • Referral Letter (if required)
  • Reports, X-rays, MRIs, CT scans, etc. and any other relevant information
  • List of medications (if any)

We encourage you to come to your initial consultation with a written list of questions to ensure you don't forget to ask them when you visit the doctor.

Are my medical records kept private and confidential?

Your medical file is handled with the utmost respect for your privacy. Our staff is bound by strict confidentiality requirements as a condition of employment regarding your medical records. We will not release the contents of your medical file without your consent.

How long do I need time off work after the surgery?

The post-operative recovery period varies based on the surgery. Generally, it is recommended patients take two weeks off work to recover from any surgery and to resume light duty following resumption of work. Your surgeon will give you specific instructions to follow for a successful recovery.

How long before I can resume driving?

You should wait at least one week before driving after surgery. The effects of anesthetic and surgery can affect judgment and reflexes during the first week following your surgery. Your surgeon will provide more specifics after considering your condition.

When can I resume exercise?

Your doctor will instruct you about post-treatment exercises - the type and the duration to be followed. You may be referred to a physical therapist to help with strengthening and range of motion exercises following surgery.

How do I contact after hours?

There will be a point of contact 24 hours a day for any concerns you may have. You will be provided with contact details following your treatment.

What is a Hip Replacement?

Hip replacement involves the removal of arthritic bone ends and damaged cartilage and replaces them with prosthetic implants that replicate the hip joint. Hip replacement can help relieve pain and get you back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

What Are the Reasons for Total Hip Replacement?

Total hip replacement is often reserved for patients who:

  • Have a painful, disabling joint disease of the hip resulting from a severe form of arthritis.
  • Are not likely to achieve satisfactory results from less invasive procedures, such as arthrodesis (artificial stiffening or fixation of the joint).
  • Have bone stock that is of poor quality or inadequate for other reconstructive techniques.

How is a Total Hip Replacement Performed?

In a total hip replacement operation, the surgeon replaces the worn surfaces of the hip joint with an artificial hip joint. The worn head of the femur (thighbone) is replaced with a metal or ceramic ball mounted on a stem; the stem is placed firmly into the canal of the thighbone at its upper end. The acetabulum (hip socket) is prepared and implanted with a metal cup and plastic or ceramic insert. The ball and insert glide together to replicate the hip joint.

Who Should Have a Hip Replacement?

Hip replacement surgery may be considered when arthritis limits your everyday activities such as walking and bending, when pain continues while resting, or stiffness in your hip limits your ability to move or lift your leg. Hip replacement may be recommended only after careful diagnosis of your joint problem. It may be time to consider surgery if you have little pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, or if other treatments, such as physical therapy, do not relieve hip pain.

How Long is the Hospital Stay?

After hip replacement surgery, you will probably spend no more than three to five days in the hospital. Most hip replacement patients begin standing and walking with the help of a walker and a physical therapist the day after surgery. However, everyone is different, and you should discuss what you can expect with your doctor.

How Long is Recuperation?

Recovery varies with each person. It is essential that you follow your orthopaedic surgeon’s instructions regarding home care during the first few weeks after surgery; especially concerning the exercise program you are prescribed. You should be able to resume most normal light activities of daily living within three to six weeks following surgery. Some discomfort during activity and at night is common for several weeks. Complete recovery can take from about three to six months.

While most people will gradually increase their activities and return to doing things like playing golf, doubles tennis, shuffleboard, or bowling, you will be advised to avoid more active sports, such as jogging, singles tennis, and other high-impact activities.

Are There Complications?

As with any surgery, there is a risk of complications after hip replacement surgery. However, they are relatively rare. Blood clots are the most common complication after surgery. Your orthopaedic surgeon may prescribe one or more measures to prevent a clot from forming in your leg veins. These measures may include a special support hose, inflatable leg coverings, and blood thinners.

What is the Success Rate?

Hip replacement is one of the most important surgical advances of this century. This surgery helps more than 300,000 Americans each year to relieve their pain, and get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.1

How Long Does a Hip Replacement Last?

The conventional arrangement of a metal ball into a special plastic (polyethylene) cup has been shown to have positive results over the years. How long it will last depends not only on age, but also a patient’s activity level. Newer hip replacement materials using more durable alumina ceramic and titanium have made major advances in hip replacement technology. Demand and activity levels are generally considered when the surgeon works with you to decide which type of hip replacement materials are best for you.

Medical

What are the non-surgical treatment options?

The non-surgical treatment options include rest, medications including analgesics and antibiotics, injections, and physical/occupational therapy.

Will physical therapy be required after surgery?

Getting full range of motion, strength, and flexibility back after surgery usually takes time. That is where pre-operative exercise, education, and post -operative physical therapy programs come in - to ensure you are physically and emotionally prepared for surgery and to maximize your recovery after surgery.

What are the risks associated with surgery?

As with any surgery, risks include reactions to anesthesia, bleeding, infection, stiffness and nerve damage. Your doctor will discuss the risks associated with your specific procedure.

When can I return to daily activities?

This varies depending on the type of procedure undergone, and can range from a few days to a few months. Return to all activities, sports and exercise can take up to four to six months. Your doctor will advise you depending on your health condition.

What can happen if surgery is avoided?

Some complications of not undergoing an orthopaedic surgery for your condition include pain, loss of joint motion, joint weakness, numbness and an early onset of arthritis.

What are the most common injuries?

The most common orthopaedic injuries are sprains and strains, fractures and dislocations. Injuries can occur when playing indoor or outdoor sports or while exercising. Sports injuries can result from accidents, inadequate training, improper use of protective devices, or insufficient stretching or warm-up exercises.

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Ortho San Antonio
2833 Babcock Rd, Tower 2
Suite 435
San Antonio, TX 78229
Phone: